G4G9, Day 4: Lasers, Sculptures, and Balloon Polyhedra

This is the 5th post in a series of posts about Gathering For Gardner: 1 2 3 4

We woke up the next day, and soon realized that the first talk had already started, but only by around a minute. Luckily, the conference was in the hotel I was staying in, so I only arrived a few minutes late. The first talk was by Jean Pedersen, about the extended face planes of various polyhedra. The next few talks were rather interesting:  Zdravko Zivkovic introduced a puzzle called “MemorIQ” where you have to make various shapes out of octagonal pieces which are colored on the sides. The sides of the pieces touching must also be the same, so it is a bit of a challenge to make a square with the pieces. Al Seckel then did a talk on “The Nature of Belief”, talking about various ambiguous optical illusions which change completely when you add a simple line to them, as well as a music track reversed which originally sounds like gibberish, but when words are added, comes out very clear. Greg Federickson did a talk on “Symmetry vs. Economy in Dissections of Squares and Cubes”.  In it, he showed many demonstrations of  dissecting squares and cubes into many smaller squares and cubes, in very symmetrical ways and also in the minimum number of pieces. He also showed examples for hinged dissections, some of which were very ingenious, especially for the cubes.  Lastly, Robert Crease talked about his new book about some of the most important equations in mathematics and science.

After a short break, the 2nd session began. Pablos Holman stated out with a great talk about “Hackers and Invention” in which he demonstrated how to kill mosquitoes by shooting lasers, changed the voicemail sound on Al Seckel’s phone by spoofing his caller ID, displayed a robot that wheels up to people and shows them their passwords, and showed how to pick a lock very quickly using a filed-down key and a hammer. After this talk, I went out with Bill Gosper, who was going to show John Conway the Universal Game Of Life Computer which Calcyman had made computing Pi. Bill also showed Conway some other Game of Life patterns, such as the same universal computer computing the digits of the Golden Ratio, and a Python script for going to a particular step in a Life simulation faster than the normal algorithm, which he demonstrated by simulating a pattern to a googol-1 steps. Because of this, I was a bit late for the last talk of the day, the overview of the math sculptures that were to be made later that day at Tom Rodger’s house, which ranged from a button knot to a huge zonohedral pavilion.

I had a quick lunch (i.e, none) and boarded the bus that would be going to Tom’s house. On the way there, I tried to figure out some particularly hard puzzles which had little or no instructions, and also talked with some of the other attendees. When we arrived, they had a lot of Japanese-style lunches set out on a table for us to eat before building the various sculptures and seeing some of the things that were already set up. Some of the most interesting things there were a metal polyhedral-ish sculpture that George Hart was making, an impossible box that you could stand in, and a huge black hyperbola that towered over everything else.

After eating my lunch, I helped build the base for the zonohedral pavilion by soaping the pieces and then placing them into place on the supports. When that was done, they started on the roof of the pavillion, and I showed a few puzzles to other attendees, inlcuding a version of the Enigma puzzle as well as a “chopstick” puzzle using some of the left-over chopsticks from lunch.

Afterwards , I helped out on another sculpture, this time a metal sculpture of a three-dimensional Peano curve, which had to be put together using  near-identical pieces and screws. The pieces were very rusty, so my hands got very dirty. Eventually it was almost done and I wandered off somewhere else. Back near the house, Vi Hart had been showing people how to make various polyhedra out of  balloons, such as simple octahedra and cubes.

I went with Gareth Conway and Max to explore a section of the landscape which Max said was an entrance to a gold or a silver mine, and which was almost completely covered with leaves from the surrounding trees. At some point, Max said that we’ll get famous for discovering this gold mine, to which Gareth responded that he was already famous for that he knew 130 digits of pi. I promptly responded with all of the digits of Pi I knew (only 30), and Gareth corrected me when I added on a few extra digits. It’s good that Michael Keith, the author of a book entirely written in Pilish wasn’t there at that point, because then I’d have to listen to quite a lot of digits of Pi. Eventually, however, it turned out that the “gold mine” was actually just a well.

Meanwhile, the polyhedral balloon-making had gotten completely out of control:

I went back to the main area, where I saw that a lot of the sculptures had been finished, such as the Chinese Button Knot and George Hart’s sculpture. I got to talk with Clifford Pickover about various things, such as the non-paradox that 100% of all integers have a 9 in them, and about some of the artwork in The Math Book, Pickover’s new book. Nearby was Ivan Moscovich, whom I talked with as well about various puzzles, such as his Mirrorkal series of sliding block puzzles in which you have to make a certain image with the pieces, which have mirrors on them so that the first puzzle is figuring out what configuration the blocks should be in afterwards. Soon, nearly all of the sculptures had been finished except for the pavilion which was almost finished and it was getting dark.

We had quite a nice dinner, although the tables were full so I had to sit nearby, where Gosper was.  We talked for some time, and I mentioned a formula that can calculate Pi to 42 billion digits but then soon diverges. After the dinner, I went into Tom’s house which, as I have said before, is absolutely filled with puzzles. I played with a few puzzles, including  a 3-piece burr and a few Japanese puzzle boxes but then encountered a puzzle that fell apart and then was impossible to put back together. By that time, it was time to go back to the hotel. I boarded the bus in the back- right next to George Hart and a few other people who had made the sculptures at Tom’s house that day, who I talked with for the ride back.

It had been a great day, and there was only 1 day of the conference left.

  1. Hi Neil – I’ve really enjoyed your series on the G4G, and look forward to the next (and last?) in the series.

    Colin

    • Gid
    • May 25th, 2010

    Hey Neil, many thanks for your posts… you covered G4G much better than New Scientist, I really felt like I was there!
    Gerard

  2. Great blog, Neil. I’m glad to have found it at last. Very nice coverage, makes it all come alive again on reading your observations. Thanks for mentioning me and the Kadon exhibit, too. And since Zdravko’s talk about MemorIQ, Kadon is now producing that puzzle. See it here: http://www.gamepuzzles.com/edgmtch5.htm#MQ — it’s amazing.

    I was delighted to find that the MemorIQ hexagons form one of the 17 wallpaper symmetry groups. We already have puzzle sets for many of these groups, and I’m hoping someday to produce a puzzle for all 17.

    Keep up the great work with this blog. I look forward to visiting it often.

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