Archive for the ‘ Sculptures and Models ’ Category

Hilbert(Hilbert)

hilbert-10-v2

In case you missed it, you can click on the image to view it at its full resolution (4096 by 4096 pixels). I highly recommend doing so- for one thing, that background’s not gray. Continue reading

Fractals

Fractals are a relatively new mathematical concept which are shapes that have detail at all levels. (i.e., you can keep zooming into the shape and always find new patterns) Fractals originated a few million years ago, but they have only been named and studied for less than 200 years, and less than 50 years if you don’t count the times when mathematicians were calling them “Monsters”.

The most simple type of fractal is one where you take a shape, and then turn the shape into a number of smaller copies of itself. Probably the most famous example of this technique is the Sierpinski Gasket, created by taking one triangle, and turning it into 3 smaller copies of itself:

Iterations of the Sierpinski Gasket

As you can see, at each succeeding iteration the new triangles are replaced, and so on. The same fractal can be made by progressively taking triangles out of triangles, and both ways can be easily done using some triangular graph paper.

A nearly as well-known fractal as the Sierpinski Gasket is the Sierpinski Carpet. To make this fractal, you take a square, divide it into 9, remove its center square, and repeat. Naturally, the same can be done by adding: Divide a square into 9 and replace each part by itself:

Iterations of the Sierpinski carpet

It’s possible to, as well as creating 2D self-similar fractals, to create 1-D self-similar fractals, which will be a line bending into two dimensions. An example of this would be the Koch Curve, discovered in 1904 by Niels Fabian Helge von Koch. To make it, start with a line, divide it into 3, and replace the middle section by 2 line segments. This can be shown better by the “generator” for the Koch curve, which shows the before and after:

If you repeat these steps, you’ll generate the following picture:

This fractal was originally called a “monster” due to the fact that it is continuous everywhere (there are no holes), but it is impossible to take a slope at a single point. In this way it is a shape that has no corners, which mathematicians regarded at the time as ridiculous. A similar fractal discovered earlier by the Italian mathematician Guiseppe Peano in 1890, the Peano curve, is similar but manages to fill space:

This was regarded as crazier by the mathematicians than the future Koch curve- Is it a line, or is it a square? It’s actually a schematic for converting one dimension into two! Even crazier than that was the Hilbert curve, discovered by David Hilbert in 1891: 

It consists mainly of taking the previous curve, adding 3 copies, and connecting those copies together.

Some of these 1-dimensional curves can be made 2-dimensional by taking multiple copies of them and putting them together. For example, there’s the Koch Snowflake, which comes from 3 copies of the Koch Curve:

Surprisingly enough, the total area of the Koch Snowflake  is not some infinite series, but rather 8/5 the area of the original triangle! Some 1-dimensional curves, such as the Peano curve, don’t need to be joined to seem to be 2-dimensional. However, the Peano curve creates what seems to be a square, and a square is certainly not a fractal. The Flowsnake, discovered by Bill Gosper and later renamed to “Peano-Gosper curve” achieves the object of having a bounding area that is both fractal and tileable!

3-Dimensional “Simple” Fractals

Up to this point we have been taking about 1 and 2-dimensional fractals, but in an effort not to make fractals too easy for computers, we now turn to 3-dimensional self-similar fractals.  To start off, the Sierpinski Carpet can be turned into a 3-dimensional version simply by replacing the squares with cubes. This causes us to use 20 times as many cubes for each step, but if you happen to have that much wood and glue around the house, you can easily make it by replacing each cube with 20 cubes, in the fashion shown below. This creates an object called the Menger Sponge, but you aren’t likely to see it on the sponge market anytime soon:

The sponge pictured above is a level 4 sponge, which would take 160,000 cubes to create. 8,000 is a much more manageable number, and so Dr. Jeannine Mosely decided to create a Level 3 Menger Sponge- out of business cards. There would be 6 cards per cube, which would then be linked, and finally paneled for a grand total of 66,048 business cards, which Dr. Mosely managed to create quite a while later:

As you can see, it’s large enough to crawl into, but as fun as it may seem, Dr. Mosely says that a Level 4 sponge made out of business cards would simply not be possible to make without structural support.

The Sierpinski Gasket also has a 3-dimensional analog: The Sierpinski Tetrahedron. To make it, you take the previous level, make 3 more copies of it, and join them by the corners.

George Hart has made a 3D model of it, and even has a good description of how to make it in his Math Monday post. With all this, you might think that there would be an interesting 3D version of the Koch Snowflake. However, when doing it like you normally would (tetrahedra on triangle) you get something quite unexpected…

Now join 4 of those together, and you get a cube. From a fractal.

All this time we have been referring to fractals as “1-dimensional”, “2D”, and “in 3 Dimensions” when in fact, as we have seen, they clearly aren’t. The Peano 1D fractal may as well be a square, and the Sierpinski 2D fractal may as well be a series of lines, and the Hilbert curve is somewhere in between. To make deciding easier, Felix Hausdorff and Abram Samoilovitch Besicovitch invented the concept of fractal dimension, which can not only be an integer, but also any number in between. To compute the fractal dimension, we use the formula D=Log(N)/Log(l), where N is the number of pieces that replace the original shape, and l is one over the scale factor. (The base of the logarithm does not matter) For example, in the Sierpinski gasket, N=3, and l=2, which means that D=Log(3)/Log(2), or about 1.584962501. This means that the Sierpinski gasket is slightly less than a square, and quite a bit more than a line. Similarly, for the “3D” Menger Sponge, its fractal dimension is Log(20)/Log(3)=2.726833028. Finally, the fractal dimension of the Peano curve is Log(9)/Log(3)= exactly 2, which means that the Peano curve, at the ∞th iteration, may as well be a square. A large list of fractals and their fractal dimensions can be found at Wikipedia.

Fractals Imitating Reality, or Vice Versa?

Self-similar fractals are not just an abstraction, though. Many plants, such as cauliflower and broccoli show self-similar behavior. On cauliflower, it can be seen by the lobes of the surface, and broccoli is a bit more chaotic, but still shows the same behavior:

Trees can also be simulated reasonably well using fractals:

 

A tree fractal

You can see the first branches by the dots

Escape-Time Fractals

Self-similar fractals get a bit boring after a while, so let’s explore another kind of fractal: Escape-time fractals. Escape-time fractals take place on the complex plane, which is an extension of the real line. Basically, it’s a plane of numbers of the form x+i*y, where i is the “imaginary number” sqrt(-1). Imaginary numbers (a+i*y) can have all the operations of real numbers done to them, such as addition (a+i*b+c+i*d=(a+c)+i(b+d)), multiplication ((a+i*b)*(c+i*d)=(ac-bd)+i(bc+ad)), as well as division, square roots, exponentiation, and every other function that can be applied to the real numbers. Now, consider a function repeatedly applied to an initial complex number until the point escapes a circle of radius r, and color it according to the number of iterations it takes to escape from the circle. If the point never escapes, or doesn’t escape after however many iterations, then color the point black.

Pierre Fatou and Gaston Julia first investigated, in the 1910s, iterations of this type, specifically iterations of the type z->z^2+c, where c is the initial point, and z is the point that changes. However, they simply noted the chaos of the system: Julia studied variations where c was a single number and z was anything, and Fatou studied the function for where c was a single number and where the initial value of z was 0. It wasn’t until 1979 that Benoit Mandelbrot would expand on Julia’s work using computer analysis.

Mandelbrot decided to use a computer to plot Julia sets using the color-by-point method, and was stunned by the results. Julia sets create self-similar fractals, but are much more interesting as they use color and are much more varied, as the following video of a set of Julia sets shows:

The next logical step after studying these would be to let c be equal to the initial value of z, and so he created what is now known as the Mandelbrot Set.

(right click and press view image for full size)

The Mandelbrot Set is unlike any of the fractals that we’ve come across so far in that it has no self-symmetry. Although there may be shapes farther in that look like the Mandelbrot Set, they aren’t quite the whole. There are many areas of the Mandelbrot set, such as the antennae-like left regions explored in the video “Trip to E214” e.g. 10^214 zoom, so large that the smallest particles postulated by physics would be nearly a googol times larger than the universe:

Or into the “Seahorse Valley” (I am not making these names up) ,where there are intricate spiral structures:

Or into a whole host of other places by using a fractal software such as the ones at the end of this post.

An interesting thing about the Mandelbrot Set is that, the farther you zoom into an area, the more it seems to look like the corresponding Julia set for that point, such as in this video, also into the Seahorse Valley area of the Mandelbrot Set:

What’s also interesting about the Mandelbrot Set is that no matter how far you zoom in, there always appears to be more intricate structures, which has led to the rise of groups specializing in computer zooms really far into the set. An example of this is the Trip to E214, and I believe the record for high definition is 10^275:

and for low definition there’s 10^999:

New structures can even pop up deep into the set, such as a long string of Xs:

(For those who don’t have the patience to watch the above video, the point can be seen at http://stardust4ever.deviantart.com/art/XX-Reactor-Core-Deep-Zoom-131573460)

By now you should have noticed a really interesting optical illusion: When you look away from a video, the space seems to be shrinking in!  It’s also the sign not to watch all of the videos all at once.

The fractal dimension for the Mandelbrot Set can also be computed, but it’s quite complicated. In fact, it was not until 1991 that Mitsuhiro Shishikura proved that the Hausdorff dimension of the Mandelbrot set equals… 2. The area of the Mandelbrot Set, however, is not so simple. Although nobody has figured out a way to calculate it precisely (The best formula I know of (i.e. only) is given in equations 7-10 on the Mathworld page), it is possible to get an estimate of it by counting pixels from -2+-2i to 2+2i, and finding what percent of them are in the set. The current best known value for the area is 1.50659177 +- 0.00000008 , given by Robert Munafo in 2003 on his page “Area of the Mandelbrot Set“. Cyril Soler, a researcher at the National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique, conjectures that the value is exactly sqrt(6*pi-1)-e, but whether he is right or wrong is not known. It is also possible to calculate exact mathematical formulae for some of the subregions of the Mandelbrot Set, such as the large cardioid-shaped blob, which can be expressed in parametric form as

The Mandelbrot Set is also connected, which means that if you take any point inside the set, you can get to any other point inside the set by following some series of pathways.

Lastly, for programmers, you can easily make your own Mandelbrot set generator even if your programming language does not support complex numbers by iterating z_realtemp->z_real*z_real – z_imag*z_imag + c_real, z_imag->2*z_real*z_imag + c_imag, and z_real->z_realtemp.A good pseudocode example is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandelbrot_set#Computer_drawings.

Naturally, the Mandelbrot Set is not the only escape-time fractal there is. First of all, there are the Mandelbrot Generalizations, z->z^p+c: (0<p<20 for the video)

[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-zmLPuQg6w]

There’s also the Phoenix Julia set, which not only relies on the previous point but the point before that, zn + 1 = zn2 + Re(c) + Im(c) * zn – 1, , where c is constant:

A good online program for exploring it on your own is at http://www.jamesh.id.au/fractals/mandel/Phoenix.html

There are an infinitude of others, so I won’t go through them all here, but a good gallery of escape-time fractal art is at http://fractalarts.com/ASF/galleries.html.

Escape-time fractals don’t have to have the escape condition be when the point goes outside a circle; In fractals such as the Newton fractal, based on the function x^3-1=0, the condition is when the point gets close enough to a root of the equation. Basically, what happens is that Newton’s method to find roots of an equation,

is iterated for f=(x^3-1=0), which creates the escape-time formula z->z-(x^3-1)/(3x^2). Once the point gets close enough to one of the roots of x^3-1: x=1,x=-(-1)^(1/3), x=(-1)^(2/3), it is colored according to the root it arrived at and the amount of time it took. This creates a Julia-like result:

Once again, this can be generalized to different functions and powers, such as in f(x)=x^5-1 :

It also turns out that most-if not all- self-similar fractals can be implemented as escape-time fractals. For example, the MilleniumFractal fractals page lists the formula for a Escape-Time version of the Sierpinski Gasket as being:

For each point c:
z0 = c

zn+1 = 2 zni, Im(zn) > 0.5
zn+1 = 2 zn – 1, Re(zn) > 0.5, Im(zn) ≤ 0.5
zn+1 = 2 zn, Re(zn) ≤ 0.5, Im(zn) ≤ 0.5

What happens is that for every point that is recursed upon, its imprecision is increased by a factor of 2 each iteration, eventually getting “thrown out” of the set.

Coloring Methods

As interesting as the fractals are the methods that can be used for visualization styles. For example, instead of coloring the Mandelbrot set by the number of iterations it takes for a point to escape, we could color the points that escape according to iterations+c_real, and the inside according to the magnitude of c=sqrt(real^2+imag^2), which would produce the following effect:

 

The bands are because of the palette

Many types of visualization for fractals have been discovered, such as “incoloring” and “outcoloring” methods. As well as the above example, one  such visualization method is Biomorphs, invented by Clifford Pickover, which makes the fractals into bacteria-like shapes. The method was based originally on an accidental bug made while programming a fractal program, which is perhaps why Mad Teddy’s code might be easier to use than my explanation!

Also, quite interesting results come from coloring the outside of the Mandelbrot Set a different color depending on whether the imaginary values of the points become negative after they escape:

Past that, there are more complicated colorings we can do, such as noticing that there is action inside the set as well as outside the set. Basically, if you iterate the Mandelbrot Set iteration on a single point over and over, the numbers will appear to converge to one number or another, showing the “orbit”. A good applet for seeing this is at http://math.hws.edu/xJava/MB/ (under Tools):

Now, suppose that at each point the point reaches, we check to see if it is within a certain area, and if so, immediately stop the iteration and color the initial point according to the place inside the trap it landed. For example, suppose we have a cross-shaped trap centered at 0+0i, colored with a gradient. Then we’d get pictures like this:

 

From fractaldomains.com

It turns out that if you take a stalk pattern like this and plot it over the entire Mandelbrot Set, stalks will appear inside the set as well as outside. These stalks are called Pickover stalks after Clifford Pickover, and often create nice spiraling patterns.

Other shapes for orbit traps can be made, with different results.  Circular orbit traps tend to show interesting detail in the Seahorse Valley regions:

 

Animations with orbit traps are especially interesting, because with animation you can not only zoom in, but you can also change the orbit trap as you’re zooming in!

A further explanation (and where a few of the images come from) is at http://www.fractaldomains.com/tutorial/orbit/index.html , and a large gallery of orbit traps is at http://softology.com.au/gallery/gallerymandelbrotorbittraps.htm !

Expanding on the idea of orbit traps, Melinda Green in 1993 proposed the following idea: Take a 2-dimensional array of integers, and then perform the standard Mandelbrot set iteration for each point, recording the places the point visits. If the point is inside the Mandelbrot Set, take the list of points the point visits and add 1 to the cells of the array corresponding to the points it visited. After you’ve computed all the points, you wind up with an array of pixels, which, when scaled and displayed, create what Lori Gardi calls the “Bhuddabrot”:

Bhuddabrots are much more computationally intensive than the standard  Mandelbrot set, because you need to sample more than 1 point per pixel and iterate thousands of times for each point to get good results, otherwise “noise” will appear around the main area. The current record for largest rendering of a Bhuddabrot is held by Johann Korndoerfer at 20,000*25,000 pixels, resulting in a Jpg file of 88 MB! He has an interesting write-up of his record at his blog, including the large image and a Firefox-friendly 5000×6000 pixel image. The image took 1,000,000 to 5,000,000 iterations per point, and took 16 hours using a custom Lisp program on an 8-core Xeon machine.

Back to Three Dimensions

At some point or another, people decided that fractals, as computationally intensive as they may be, were getting too easy for computers.On October 13, 2006,  Marco Vernaglione set out the challenge of finding a 3D analog of the Mandelbrot Set, and on 8/11/2009, Daniel White of skytopia.com succeeded, discovering a 3-dimensional version of the Mandelbrot Set: The Mandelbulb.

 

By rephrasing the Mandelbrot set as an iteration in polar coordinates, White managed to generalize the iteration to 3D polar coordinates, getting the iteration:

r = sqrt(x*x + y*y + z*z )
theta = atan2(sqrt(x*x + y*y) , z)
phi = atan2(y,x)

newx = r^n * sin(theta*n) * cos(phi*n)
newy = r^n * sin(theta*n) * sin(phi*n)
newz = r^n * cos(theta*n)

where n is the power. White originally tried n=2, but with discouraging results. Paul Nylander, however, suggested setting n=8, which created the Mandelbulb as we know it.

Using 3D graphics technology, we can zoom into the Mandelbulb and render scenes inside it, some of which can seem amazingly realistic, such as this which White calls the “Mandelbulb Spine”:

More renders are at Daniel White’s website, which I strongly encourage you to visit!

If it is a fractal, there is an animation of it. The same rule holds for the Mandelbulb, and a number of amazing zooms have been made. For example, there’s Daniel White’s zoom into the top part:

As you can see, it’s fairly hard to navigate in 3D using a 2D mouse.

Other sections of the Mandelbulb resemble the broccoli mentioned earlier, as in the end of this video:

As strange as the Mandelbulb may seem, it has some areas strikingly similar to the Mandelbrot Set. For example, here is a part of the Mandelbulb:

Here’s a Mandelbrot spiral:

After the Mandelbulb was discovered, other 3-dimensional fractals suddenly started to appear, many from FractalForums.com . A stunning example is the Mandelbox, which is like a much more complex version of the Mandelbulb:

On the interior, it can seem cavernous, and with the right coloring it can even seem like an ancient palace:

At last count, there are 354 versions of the Mandelbulb, such as polyhedral IFS, TGlad’s variations… This blog post, long as it may be, is simply too short to talk about all of them.

To 4D, and Beyond!

I’ve skipped ahead a bit by talking about the Mandelbulb and the Mandelbox, because in reality a 4-dimensional fractal, the Quaternion Julia Fractal, was discovered first. In 1843, while walking on a bridge in Dublin, Sir William Rowan Hamilton discovered a way to represent a “4-dimensional” complex number, made up of three complex parts: i, j, and k, and a real part, with the formula:

i² = j² = k² = i j k = −1

It turns out that quaternions are really quite complex (no pun intended), in that they are not commutative under addition. That is,

This makes some very complex formulae for squaring, multiplication, and other functions (see Paul Bourke’s article on pretty much everything about quaternions) . However, the formula for the Quaternion Julia fractal is the same as the normal Julia: z=z^2+c, where z is a quaternion, and c is another constant quaternion. However, in this case, if we choose the right slice of the 4D object to display on the screen, we get very strange self-similar fractals:

Videos of the quaternion Julia fractals changing are even more hard to comprehend, a bit of truth to A.Square’s story:

A 4-dimensional Mandelbrot set can also be made, but so far as I know nobody’s done a good rendering of it yet.

First, suppose we go back to the original Mandelbrot Set. For every point in the Mandelbrot Set, we can generate a Julia set by setting the variable c value of that point in the Mandelbrot Set to the c value of the Julia set. Now, suppose we take all of the Julia sets in one column of the Mandelbrot set, and layer them on top of each other like pages in a stack, thus creating a 3-dimensional object. Now, suppose we do that with all of the columns in the Mandelbrot Set, creating a bunch of 3-dimensional fractals. Lastly, we take all of the 3-fractals, and layer them on top of each other in 4-dimensional space, and you have the 4-dimensional version of the Mandelbrot Set (from http://www.superliminal.com/fractals/surfaces/index.html):

 

Best detail I could find. If you have a better one, feel free to post it in the comments!

Of course, you could also use quaternions and the formula z=z^2+c to compute another 4D Mandelbrot, but it turns out that all it does is spin the set around:

 

From Paul Nylander

Now, if it turns out that 4 dimensions isn’t enough, we can always generalize fractals to higher and higher dimensions. We can simulate 5-dimensional cauliflower, 7-dimensional Koch snowflakes, or we can even generalize the Quaternion Julia, Mandelbrot, and Mandelbulb  formulas to 8 dimensions or more.

But in the end, it all comes down to how fast we can draw. But whether by hand or by computer, fractals are still amazing.

 

G4G9, Day 5: Balancing Laptops, Mobius Music, and Egg Cartons

This is the 6th and final post in a series of posts about Gathering For Gardner: 1 2 3 4 5

I started the last day of Gathering For Gardner 9 by waking up late.

As a result, I completely missed the first talk and entered the conference room in the middle of the second talk, by Karl Schaffer, about “Dancing Tessellations”. It consisted mainly of a few videos in which a normal dance would be reflected along certain axes so that it effectively makes a video tessellation. The next one was a short talk on extending the Side-Angle-Side (SAS) similarity theorem to three-dimensional shapes using the least possible number of measurements. One of the especially interesting talks in the first session was by Linda Zayas-Palmer, on why the infinite number, 0.999999… , is actually not just equivalent to, but greater than, 1. The talk directly after that was about some of Salvador Dali’s puzzles in some of his paintings, in which you have to find a certain phrase. Turns out his puzzles are rather easy.  My favorite talk in the session, though, was by Burkard Polster on how to balance your laptop on a bedside table such that it occupies the minimum amount of space on the table and doesn’t fall off. It starts out by a simple dissection of a square by Martin Gardner, and then exteds it to show how to balance the laptop just right so that it’ll balance, thus leaving room for puzzles or whatever you would put on a bedside table.

During the break, Mom and I went up to the exhibit room, where the exhibitors were packing up their exhibits. Most of the exhibits were already gone, but a few were there that weren’t the first time. For one of these, involving curious polyhedral sculptures made with egg cartons, Mom actually got to talk with Jeannie Mosely, the person who made them. In fact, she actually got a model of the octahedron which had fairly novel methods of holding together as an example to make more.

After the break, the talks continued with a talk on 3-dimensional packing puzzles made out of various spheres glued together to make polyomino-like shapes. Due to the spherical nature of the pieces, some of the puzzles need the polyspheres to “snap” together, something which doesn’t normally happen. A rather good talk in this session was by Ed Pegg, about the Wolfram Demonstrations Project, and some of the best demonstrations that had been posted, such as a program to find the smallest box that squares of size 1/n can fit in:

Or even how to solve the Orchard-Planting Problem, involving finding a certain number of lines that pass through a certain number of points, given the required points:

The talk after Ed Pegg’s talk was one of the most anticipated talks of the entire conference: Finding a single shape that covers the entire plane aperiodically, which was an unsolved problem. Joshua Socolar managed to find a single hexagonal tile (with matching rules, though) which creates a Sierpinski Gasket-like shape when made. He also made a 3-dimensional tile which acts the same.

The 2-d tile

Afterwards, Vi Hart did a great talk on making music with music boxes with the music scores in Mobius strips, or the music boxes arranged in such a way so that the music played by one music box is played by another music box seconds later.

After Vi Hart’s talk the lunch break started, but instead of going to lunch  I went immediately up to the Gift Exchange area, where I would wait in line to get a bag full of exchange gifts from nearly everybody, repeated for everyone, who would get one also.

Apparently everybody else had the same idea of waiting in line early. I ended up behind Bram Cohen, inventor of BitTorrent as well as a whole bunch of super-duper-hard twisty puzzles which have some rather ingenious ideas behind them. He happened to have a few non-twisty, but still hard, puzzles while waiting in line, and I managed to almost solve one of them (the Cast Rattle), which involved getting the right pieces in the right place (That isn’t a spoiler, is it?). The other one, Cast Marble, I couldn’t get immediately, but I might have been getting close. Soon, I got to the front of the line to get my bag of exchange gifts and got the huge bag (I could barely carry it) as well as a few other miscellaneous items from people at a few nearby tables, such as a perplexing wooden object which looked like a gear, or a few pictures from Caspar Schwabe (I presume) of large inflatable solids, including the huge 59th stellation of the icosahedron seen on day 3.

I brought the huge bag of gifts up to the hotel room to open, and even though the bag’s heaviness was an indicator of the number of things inside, it still felt like Christmas when I opened it. There were mathematical dice with the sides only using the number nine and a set of plastic rings with interchangeable art based on the Traveling Salesman problem; there was a CD containing rather high-quality pictures as well as a digital copy of the exchange book from G4G8; A set of pieces for an unsolved puzzle and a key to open doors with using a hammer; A book about formulae that changed the world and a second copy of  A New Kind of Science(Ah, so that’s where the heaviness came from);Even a mysterious back-scratcher and tapper. These are just a few of the things in the bag, and to list them all out would certainly lengthen this blog post by quite a lot.

By the time I had gotten to the bottom of the bag, the third session was about to start so I had to rush down to see the talk by Gordon Hamilton (of the Magical Mathematics Museum) about having problems in K-12 classrooms involving unsolved problems such as the circle-packing problem (In how small a square can you pack n circles?), the 3n+1 conjecture (Do all Collatz sequences end in 4,2,1?), and others. Also in the same session was Solomon Golomb’s talk about the Pentomino Game on nxn boards. The “Pentomino Game”, is a rather interesting two-player game in which players alternate turns placing pentominoes onto an 8×8 board. The first player who can not place another piece loses. One of the most interesting talks of the session was “Fun with Egg Cartons” by Jeannie Mosely. In the talk,  she described how she made most of the Platonic Solids – out of egg cartons! The process of making these is pretty easy- just interleave strips of egg cartons at the vertices to make the edges- but the results are still interesting.

Immediately following was a talk not relating to mathematics at all (but still cool), about restoring various ancient text adventures. The talk was by Adam Atkinson, and it was about cross-compiling old text adventures (running on mainframes) so that you could play them on newer computers. Many of them are stored at ifarchive.org (the Archive for Interactive Fiction), including Acheton, probably the third text adventure ever made. Just don’t get eaten by a grue.

After the last short break, the last session of G4G9 began. Kate Jones started of with a philosophical talk involving pentomino puzzles,followed by Bill Mullins, who talked about Martin Gardner’s search for the person who wrote “The Expert at the Card Table”, probably the most important book ever on sleight of hand with cards, who wrote his name as “S.W.Erdnase”. It can be reversed to make E.S.Andrews , but from there it’s much harder. So far, they’ve found 5 suspects as to who S.W.Erdnase might be, 2 by Gardner and 3 by others, but the writer remains hidden. Hirokazu Iwasawa (also known as Iwahiro) then followed that with a talk about the subclass of “Hat-Team Puzzles” , how to solve them, as well as other variations on the problem. A bit later, Colin Wright did a double talk about “How far is the Moon?” and about notations for juggling. The former was left out (the pdf is available here) , but the talk about juggling was amazing. Not only did he juggle normally with up to 5 balls, but he also showed how to use a notation for juggling to make up your own tricks, some insanely complex and others trivial. Following that, George Hart talked about his new sculpture, “Comet!” which involves multiple smaller versions of the main model (a puzzle-like polyhedral-ish form) with different colors. It’s so big that it has to be hung on the ceiling of an atrium. After that, Mike Keith did the second-to-last talk about his book, Not A Wake, in which every word of the text- including the subtitle and the title- has the same number of  letters as the nth digit of pi does. The book goes on for 10,000 digits, with 10 stories followed by the digits of pi in that story, each story being a different style than the others.

After the last talk and closing notes, G4G9 was over. However, the fun(at least for me) continued. I was invited to dinner (along with Bill Gosper, Mom, Julian and Corey Hunts) by Dick Esterle to the Varsity Jr., an old-style fast food diner that had been operating for 45 years. Bill and Julian declined, but the rest of us went.

The diner had good food (especially the burgers) , and talking with Esterle was quite interesting. I brought a box puzzle (the same from the prelude) , and he managed to solve it in record time just by shaking it hard. He also, using the materials that were available, gave me 2 versions of the same puzzle. First, arrange 3 cups in an equilateral triangle such that a knife can reach from any cup to any other cup. Then, use the knives to balance a salt shaker in the middle of the triangle above the table. (This can be done using 2 knives) Then, set the cups so that they are just a bit too far for the knives to reach, and once again balance the salt shaker using 3 knives. Corey and I eventually solved it and put a few straw decorations on (from my solution to the problem using straws to extend the knives and only using 2 knives). To prevent spoilers, it’s at http://daftmusings.stattenfield.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/Neil-and-Corey-at-the-Varsity-copy.jpg .

After dinner, Dick Esterle drove us back to the Ritz-Carlton, where we went back up to our hotel rooms and played with puzzles until bedtime.

The day after that, I was waken up very early to get packed up for the airplane trip back to San Jose. We met Bill Gosper in the hotel lobby, and took a cab to the airport, at which point we waited until dawn-ish. On the airplane trip back (with an exchange in Chicago), I looked at all of the exchange gifts in the bag and Bill Gosper programmed on his laptop. Eventually, after having 2 breakfasts due to time zones, we landed in San Jose, drove over to my house, whereupon Bill drove back to his house. And because of time zones, I still had the rest of the day to play with puzzles.

Thus the epic of Gathering for Gardner 9 ended.

It was an absolutely great experience from before it even started to it’s end, and I met a lot of new people and saw a lot of puzzles and magic tricks and optical illusions. I would certainly go the next time it happens, and the time after that. Certainly, it was one of the best events that I attended ever, if not the best.

As an afterword, on May 22, Martin Gardner died. Hearing the news of this was incredibly saddening to me, as well as sudden. He was one of the most important people that ever lived, for mathematics and as well as for many other subjects. He helped popularize M.C. Escher and Godel,Escher,Bach , and introduced mathematics in a fun way to at least everybody at any of the G4Gs. He was truly amazing.

G4G9, Day 4: Lasers, Sculptures, and Balloon Polyhedra

This is the 5th post in a series of posts about Gathering For Gardner: 1 2 3 4

We woke up the next day, and soon realized that the first talk had already started, but only by around a minute. Luckily, the conference was in the hotel I was staying in, so I only arrived a few minutes late. The first talk was by Jean Pedersen, about the extended face planes of various polyhedra. The next few talks were rather interesting:  Zdravko Zivkovic introduced a puzzle called “MemorIQ” where you have to make various shapes out of octagonal pieces which are colored on the sides. The sides of the pieces touching must also be the same, so it is a bit of a challenge to make a square with the pieces. Al Seckel then did a talk on “The Nature of Belief”, talking about various ambiguous optical illusions which change completely when you add a simple line to them, as well as a music track reversed which originally sounds like gibberish, but when words are added, comes out very clear. Greg Federickson did a talk on “Symmetry vs. Economy in Dissections of Squares and Cubes”.  In it, he showed many demonstrations of  dissecting squares and cubes into many smaller squares and cubes, in very symmetrical ways and also in the minimum number of pieces. He also showed examples for hinged dissections, some of which were very ingenious, especially for the cubes.  Lastly, Robert Crease talked about his new book about some of the most important equations in mathematics and science.

After a short break, the 2nd session began. Pablos Holman stated out with a great talk about “Hackers and Invention” in which he demonstrated how to kill mosquitoes by shooting lasers, changed the voicemail sound on Al Seckel’s phone by spoofing his caller ID, displayed a robot that wheels up to people and shows them their passwords, and showed how to pick a lock very quickly using a filed-down key and a hammer. After this talk, I went out with Bill Gosper, who was going to show John Conway the Universal Game Of Life Computer which Calcyman had made computing Pi. Bill also showed Conway some other Game of Life patterns, such as the same universal computer computing the digits of the Golden Ratio, and a Python script for going to a particular step in a Life simulation faster than the normal algorithm, which he demonstrated by simulating a pattern to a googol-1 steps. Because of this, I was a bit late for the last talk of the day, the overview of the math sculptures that were to be made later that day at Tom Rodger’s house, which ranged from a button knot to a huge zonohedral pavilion.

I had a quick lunch (i.e, none) and boarded the bus that would be going to Tom’s house. On the way there, I tried to figure out some particularly hard puzzles which had little or no instructions, and also talked with some of the other attendees. When we arrived, they had a lot of Japanese-style lunches set out on a table for us to eat before building the various sculptures and seeing some of the things that were already set up. Some of the most interesting things there were a metal polyhedral-ish sculpture that George Hart was making, an impossible box that you could stand in, and a huge black hyperbola that towered over everything else.

After eating my lunch, I helped build the base for the zonohedral pavilion by soaping the pieces and then placing them into place on the supports. When that was done, they started on the roof of the pavillion, and I showed a few puzzles to other attendees, inlcuding a version of the Enigma puzzle as well as a “chopstick” puzzle using some of the left-over chopsticks from lunch.

Afterwards , I helped out on another sculpture, this time a metal sculpture of a three-dimensional Peano curve, which had to be put together using  near-identical pieces and screws. The pieces were very rusty, so my hands got very dirty. Eventually it was almost done and I wandered off somewhere else. Back near the house, Vi Hart had been showing people how to make various polyhedra out of  balloons, such as simple octahedra and cubes.

I went with Gareth Conway and Max to explore a section of the landscape which Max said was an entrance to a gold or a silver mine, and which was almost completely covered with leaves from the surrounding trees. At some point, Max said that we’ll get famous for discovering this gold mine, to which Gareth responded that he was already famous for that he knew 130 digits of pi. I promptly responded with all of the digits of Pi I knew (only 30), and Gareth corrected me when I added on a few extra digits. It’s good that Michael Keith, the author of a book entirely written in Pilish wasn’t there at that point, because then I’d have to listen to quite a lot of digits of Pi. Eventually, however, it turned out that the “gold mine” was actually just a well.

Meanwhile, the polyhedral balloon-making had gotten completely out of control:

I went back to the main area, where I saw that a lot of the sculptures had been finished, such as the Chinese Button Knot and George Hart’s sculpture. I got to talk with Clifford Pickover about various things, such as the non-paradox that 100% of all integers have a 9 in them, and about some of the artwork in The Math Book, Pickover’s new book. Nearby was Ivan Moscovich, whom I talked with as well about various puzzles, such as his Mirrorkal series of sliding block puzzles in which you have to make a certain image with the pieces, which have mirrors on them so that the first puzzle is figuring out what configuration the blocks should be in afterwards. Soon, nearly all of the sculptures had been finished except for the pavilion which was almost finished and it was getting dark.

We had quite a nice dinner, although the tables were full so I had to sit nearby, where Gosper was.  We talked for some time, and I mentioned a formula that can calculate Pi to 42 billion digits but then soon diverges. After the dinner, I went into Tom’s house which, as I have said before, is absolutely filled with puzzles. I played with a few puzzles, including  a 3-piece burr and a few Japanese puzzle boxes but then encountered a puzzle that fell apart and then was impossible to put back together. By that time, it was time to go back to the hotel. I boarded the bus in the back- right next to George Hart and a few other people who had made the sculptures at Tom’s house that day, who I talked with for the ride back.

It had been a great day, and there was only 1 day of the conference left.